Thursday, May 21, 2009

Kris: Named “Idol” Winner

by Anthony J Sepe

http://fromadietitiansperspective.blogspot.com

 

1119831287z24SYY You are a winner too, because including all foods from all food groups, is healthiest for you.  And, even meat!  There is nothing wrong with eating meat, but the choice, should be healthy-lean cuts of beef.  Yes, cut-off any visible saturated fat, too.  Sometimes, you may not escape marbleized meat, but having meat is not wrong.  So, here’s a Beef and Broccoli Stir-Fry for you.

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Beef and Broccoli Stir-Fry

1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce

2 T lemon juice

1 T Cornstarch

1 T firmly packed dark brown sugar

1 clove of garlic, crushed

1 tsp black pepper, crushed

2 T olive oil

1 # top sirloin

1 med onion, sliced

2 med heads, broccoli

2 tsp grated fresh, ginger

 

1. In a small bowl, combine soy sauce, lemon juice, cornstarch, sugar, garlic and pepper. Set aside.

2. Heat 1 T oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat.  Add beef and stir fry until almost cooked through about 2 minutes.  Transfer beef to a plate and cover to keep warm.

3. Heat remaining oil in skillet.  Add onion and stir-fry for 5 minutes.  cut broccoli into florets and add to skillet with 1/2 cup water,.  Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for 3 minutes.

4. Return beef to skillet with soy sauce mixture; add ginger.  Bring to a boil and cook, stirring constantly, until sauce thicken, about 2 minutes—serve hot!

5. Enjoy !!!

4 comments:

  1. Hi Anthony, I don't eat as much beef because I'm trying to steer off meat a bit more but hubby likes beef and I've tried the sirloin, but to afford it, I've had to switch down to lean ground beef. It doesn't have as much oil as say ground beef, ground chuck do but it's like one step below ground sirloin. Is that ok to use or should I really stick to sirloin? Also, I added your blog to my new bath products blog at http://bodybathproducts@blogspot.com.

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  2. Hi Kim,

    Meat is composed of muscle fiber, connective tissue, bones and fat. The composition of most meat has changed over time. Many animals raised for meat are bred to have more muscle fiber and less fat. Meat is also trimmed closer, so that it has less fat. Generally, the leanest cuts of meat are from the loin and the round.

    The quality grading is voluntary and includes such characteristics as marbling, firmness, color and texture. Grades are stamped on the outside layer of the meat of wholesale cuts. USDA Prime grade meat is the most tender, juicy and flavorful, but also has the most fat and is the most costly. USDA Choice follows and is widely accepted and preferred by consumers. USDA Select beef is the leanest of the 3 common consumer quality grades. Other grades used are mainly for canned products.

    Now, ground meats and poultry are generally mixtures of lean meant and fat. Ground beef labeled as 95% lean usually meets the nutrition description “lean” as defined by the Nutrition Education and Labeling Act of 1990. Percent Lean refers to the weight of the meant, not the calories it contains.
    For beef, ground round is usually the leanest, followed by ground sirloin, ground check and finally regular ground beef. Look for greater percentages of lean to fat. If the ground meat is cooked before adding to recipes, it should be well-drained. When this process is used, less expensive, higher fat, regular ground beef can be used in recipes. Leaner ground beef carries premium prices.

    Remember too, all meat, but especially ground meat, should be thawed in the refrigerator, never on the counter—and on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.

    Also, thank you for adding me to your new blog--how kind and thoughtful of you.

    With my best regards,
    Anthony

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  3. Thank you Anthony, I know now where to come for answers when I have questions like this! :D

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  4. You are most welcome; my pleasure!
    ~Anthony

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